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Amateur Cinema Studies Network News

‘Brazilian amateur cinema: history, discourses and practices (1926-1959)’

Lila Silva Foster, ‘Brazilian amateur cinema: history, discourses and practices (1926-1959) /Cinema amador brasileiro: história, discursos e práticas (1926-1959)’ – doctoral thesis, 2016, Escola de Comunicações e Artes, Universidade de São Paulo.

‘My private life’ (2014/15)

Effective use of home movies in Jill Daniels’ autobiographical film ‘My private life‘  (UK. 2014/15).

Bryan Forbes Home Movies

Bryan Forbes Home Movies (No. 43 1968) on BFI player – features Giulietta Masina, Katharine Hepburn, Yul Brynner, Charles Boyer, Nanette Newman and Donald Pleasence.

Amateur cinematography -DIY

Amateur cinematography (1948): ‘[d]emonstration on how to make a film, made as a trailer for the 10th Scottish Amateur Film Festival held in the Cosmo Cinema, Glasgow’.

BAFTSS Amateur Cinema SIG conference panel, 21 April 2017

Amateur cinema and its multiple film sub-genres“, 21 April 2017, BAFTSS Amateur Cinema SIG panel, BAFTTS Conference, Bristol, UK

Overview: There is an urgency to circumscribe, re-define and develop a critical language able to cope with the rapid shift between what was conventionally categorised as private and personal – i.e. home movies watched and distributed as ‘home entertainment’ – and what has become in the digital space a public, global privacy where the image-maker adopts the amateur’s creatively liberating status. The three speakers will place their core research agenda at the confluence of such clashing and yet co- dependent moving-image production and distribution practices and will consider possible new directions in inter-disciplinary scholarship. Each speaker will explore methodical, extensive approaches addressing developments in amateur cinema practice and studies while relying on the intrinsic interdisciplinary approach dictated by specific questions of technology, social and political dynamics, economic structures, changing aesthetic cannons, and contemporary cultural patterns. They will consider new insights regarding the ways in which visual and memory experiences are currently shaped, stored and re-distributed across new amateur cinema/media technologies and visual channels, and will discuss several examples of visual methodologies relevant to collective memory and representation studies within the global framework of amateur/user- generated film and media.

For further details about the three papers presented see BAFTSS Amateur Cinema SIG panel

 

‘Towards a global history of amateur film practices and institutions’

Forthcoming Film History special issue titled ‘Towards a global history of amateur film practices and institutions’ (2017), guest edited by Enrique Fibla-Gutiérrez and Masha Salazkina.

CFP Cinema of Exploration: Essays on an Adventurous Film Practice

Cinema of Exploration: Essays on an Adventurous Film Practice‘, Editors: James Leo Cahill (University of Toronto) and Luca Caminati (Concordia University, Montreal)

Deadline for abstracts: March 15, 2017

Contributions are invited on topics such as:

– The auteur as explorer (Antonioni, Herzog, Rossellini, Rouch, Wenders, etc.)
– Space travel; science fiction travelogues; NASA and other space agencies image making productions
– Underwater filmmaking
– Scientific filmmaking; micro-cinema; medical image-making
Non-professional filmmakers, amateur explorers, DIY technologies and aesthetics of exploration; home-made or family travelogues; Go-Pro films.
– Media arts productions; gallery and museum installations
– Film festival devoted to travel and exploration films
– Experimental/avant-garde cinema of exploration; experimental anthropology
– Nature as spectacle; National Geographic-style and its earlier versions (safari and expedition films, etc.)
– Cinema of exploration in relation to didactic and educational films (National Outdoors Leadership School, Exploration Film Tour, etc.)
– Military filmmaking
– Histories of critical debates about the status of the cinema of exploration in film and media
– The impact of the study of cinema of exploration on film historiography – Ecological impact of filmmaking on the environments and species

“Film and media scholars have begun to pay increasing attention to the entangled histories of cinematic media and forms of exploration: from audiovisual documentation of explorations of nature, people, and places, on the one hand, to what Stan Brakhage has called “adventures in perception,” or the manner in which these media may also be instruments of exploration in their own right, tracing the depths and limits of perception and the perceivable. From early cinema’s panoramas and travelogues, to more recent made-for-TV spectacles and immersive IMAX experiences, scholars have begun to examine and conceptualize the histories of this heterogeneous mode of filmmaking, demonstrating its often underexamined importance to some of the key questions posed by cinema and media studies. In light of postcolonial and globalization theories, as well as ecological and environmental criticism, attention has been given to filmic practices perceived as instruments of colonization, conquest, and ecological devastation through visual surveying, capture, and domestication. The legacies of imperialism, racism, and orientalism haunt the history and even present practice of the cinema of exploration. This mode of production has been tightly entwined with the extraction and exploitation of resources, territories, and species that have become increasingly politicized and urgent in an era of increasing ecological precarity. But these same practices have also been instrumental in cultivating wonder about the world and its multifarious inhabitants, and even serving as sites for reimagining one’s relations to them.

With these ideas in mind, we invite contributions to an anthology on “Cinema of Exploration: Essays on an Adventurous Film Practice.” We seek essays that discuss the implications of exploration filmmaking around the world in relation to the technological, social, cultural, and economic developments that marked its emergence and import in different geopolitical contexts. We welcome essays that tackle the global tradition of travel films from early anthropological reportages to different contemporary variations on the theme of the travelogue, presented through a wide array of modes of filmmaking (anthropological, “national geographic”, documentary, experimental, avant-garde, “fakes”, etc.). Of interest are explorations of film genres contingent on the trope of cinematic exploration (wild-life documentaries, Westerns, space operas, etc.). We are also looking for contributions focused on a wide variety of scientific exploration through film, from early examples of science documentaries and theoretical discourses, to the contemporary debates on the role of micro-cinema in the recording of experiments and other audiovisual technologies of life sciences.

Some questions that animate our endeavors are: How does the development of these practices and discourses impact our understanding of the history and geography of moving images? How do they both reflect and impact the actual technological and sociocultural developments of our age? What role have these traditions played in the development of film theory, media epistemology, and concepts of perception, world, and universe? How have exploration films changed in the Anthropocene?

Send a 500-600 word abstract and a brief biographical note to luca.caminati@concordia.ca and james.cahill@utoronto.ca by March 15th, 2017. The editorial team will notify selected proposals by April 15th, 2017. We expect completed manuscripts (between 7,000 and 9,000 words) be due December 1st, 2017, and accepted for publication pending editorial and external readers evaluation. All submissions will be subjected to double blind peer review.”

 

Italian amateur cinema as cultural heritage…

See ‘Italian amateur cinema as cultural heritage and source for audiovisual and media production‘ by Paolo Simoni

 

 

‘Turkowski’s ‘Margarete’’

See HMP article ‘Turkowski’s ‘Margarete’ at Noorderzon 2012

‘… multiple forms of first-person filmmaking…’

CFP: ‘Multivoicedness and European Cinema: Representation, Industry, Politics’ conference (University College Cork, Ireland, 10th – 11th November 2017).

European cinema has evolved from a homogenous and selective object of study, mostly shaped by frameworks of national industry, identity and culture, to a much more diversified field, reflecting the shift to a post-colonial, post-communist, post-national, globalised Europe. In the context of an increasingly diverse but also split society, in which social polarisation is on the increase due to the crisis of the Eurozone and the decline of the welfare states, and in which populism and nationalisms are on the rise, resulting in the strengthening of the Fortress Europe project, this conference aims to turn the spotlight on the less-represented and less-audible voices in European cinema in all its forms: fiction, documentary, mainstream, art house, independent, exploitation, art film. With an inclusive focus encompassing issues of production, distribution and reception, of representation and of form, of dissent and of control, the conference invites contributions that engage from a wide range of theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches with the politics of difference and with the representation and/or expression of alternative viewpoints in European films / in films made in Europe.

Keynote Speakers: Professor Ewa Mazierska (University of Central Lancashire) and Professor Chris Wahl (Film University Babelsberg Konrad Wolf)

Abstracts are invited on topics related to Multivoicedness in European Cinema, including but not limited to:
Multivoicedness in national and transnational European cinemas
Peripheries, borders, and grey areas: falling between the cracks, speaking from the margins
Ethics and/or aesthetics of alternative voices
Audiodescription, subtitling and dubbing of multivoiced films
Cultural and market negotiations: translating cultures, crossing borders
Participation, dissent, resistance: audiences, politics, and public discourse
Alternative European cinemas and the global market
Other voices: niche markets, new forms of consumption
Deterritorialising identities, becoming migrant/minoritarian
Polyglot cinema: speaking from multiple subject positions
Genders and genres: decentering and in-betweenness
Alternative film festivals and other cinemas
Speaking in tongues: the audiences of multivoiced films
Queering European cinema
Nonfiction and commitment: documenting the silenced subject
Speaking for oneself: multiple forms of first-person filmmaking
Transnational, cosmopolitan, global: what European cinema?
A continent in motion: multiple commitments, divided belongings
The “New Europeans” in films / making films
Margins of industrial practices, alternative forms of production, distribution and reception
Speaking parts: person, character, actor, star
The conference will also be the host to special panel sections prepared by the HoMER network (History of Moviegoing, Exhibition and Reception) and FFRN (Film Festival Research network).

Abstract submission: Please submit your abstract (max 300 words) along with key references, institutional affiliation and a short bio (max 150 words) or a panel proposal, including a panel presentation (max 300 words) along with minimum 3, maximum 4 individual abstracts.

Submission deadline: May 2nd 2017. 

Proposal acceptance notification: June 23rd 2017.

Please send your abstract/panel proposals to the conference email address: filmstudiesecrea@gmail.com

Submissions for the HoMER section should be sent to Daniela Treveri Gennari: dtreveri-gennari@brookes.ac.uk and submissions for the FFRN section should be sent to Skadi Loist: skadi.loist@uni-rostock.de. ECREA membership is not required to participate in the conference. Delegates will be required to contribute towards administrative and catering costs.

Conference details: The Conference is hosted and supported by the Department of Film and Screen Media, University College of Cork, Ireland: http://www.ucc.ie/en/filmstudies/

Conference organisers: Laura Rascaroli (University College Cork), Sergio Villanueva Baselga (Universitat de Barcelona), Helle Kannik Haastrup (University of Copenhagen), Anders Marklund (University of Lund), Gertjan Willems (Ghent University).

Conference email address: filmstudiesecrea@gmail.com

Conference website

© 2012 Amateur Cinema Studies Network (ACSN)